Inspection Information

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 What should I do?

A home inspection should be scheduled as soon as possible. Certain times of the year are much busier than others.

We generally have two inspectors on site at all inspections. Even at that please allow at least two to three hours for the average home. When ever possible we recommend that the client attend the home inspection. But if you can not attend our report along with the photographs is very easy to read and understand.

Should you have any questions, ask the inspector while you’re at the property or after you read the report, we are happy to discuss any concerns that you may have.

What is a home inspection?

A home inspection is a limited, non-invasive examination of the condition of a home, often in connection with the sale of that home. Home inspections are usually conducted by a home inspector who has the training and certifications to perform such inspections. The inspector prepares and delivers to the client a written report of findings. The client then uses the knowledge gained to make informed decisions about their pending real estate purchase. The home inspector describes the condition of the home at the time of inspection but does not guarantee future condition, efficiency, or life expectancy of systems or components.

A home inspector is sometimes confused with a real estate appraiser. A home inspector determines the condition of a structure, whereas an appraiser determines the value of a property. Although not all states or municipalities in the U.S. regulate home inspectors, there are some professional associations for home inspectors that provide education, training, and networking opportunities. A professional home inspection is an examination of the current condition of a house. It is not an inspection to verify compliance with appropriate codes.

Our Inspections Include the Following:

  • roof, vents, flashings and trim;(Limited)
  • gutters and downspouts;
  • skylight, chimney, and other roof penetrations;
  • decks, stoops, porches, walkways and railings;
  • eaves, soffits and fascia;
  • grading and drainage;
  • basement, foundation and crawlspace;
  • water penetration and foundation movement;
  • heating system;
  • cooling system;
  • main water shut-off valve;
  • water heating system;
  • interior plumbing fixtures and faucets;
  • drainage sump pumps with accessible floats;
  • electrical service line and meter box;
  • main disconnect and service amperage;
  • electrical panel(s), breakers and fuses;
  • grounding and bonding;
  • GFCIs and AFCIs;
  • fireplace damper door and hearth;
  • insulation and ventilation;
  • garage doors, safety sensors and openers;
  • and much more.

Review our Standards of Practice at www.nachi.org/sop.htm for complete details and limitations.